Overview

exercise physiology


'exercise physiology' can also refer to...

Exercise physiology

exercise physiology

exercise physiology

Physiological effects of exercise

Exercise, Physiological Function, and the Selection of Participants for Aging Research

Physiological parameters during the initial stages of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in patients with chronic heart failure Their value in the assessment of clinical severity and prognosis

Physiological Modeling of Inhalation Kinetics of Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane in Humans during Rest and Exercise

Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Inhalation Exposure of Humans to Dichloromethane during Moderate to Heavy Exercise

Oxygen- and heart rate kinetics during early recovery from exercise: Which sensor is physiologic?

486 Stress echocardiography in the evaluation of exercise physiology in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension

Sex differences in exercise-induced physiological myocardial hypertrophy are modulated by oestrogen receptor beta

Physiological aspects and clinical sequelae of energy deficiency and hypoestrogenism in exercising women

Effects of Moderate-Intensity Exercise on Physiological, Behavioral, and Emotional Responses to Family Caregiving A Randomized Controlled Trial

The defence of legitimate exercise physiology research from real and perceived bias: a rebuttal

Effects of physical exercise on depression, neuroendocrine stress hormones and physiological fitness in adolescent females with depressive symptoms

The Effect of Air Permeability Characteristics of Protective Garments on the Induced Physiological Strain under Exercise-Heat Stress

Physiological rehabilitation after video-assisted lung lobectomy for cancer: a prospective study of measuring daily exercise and oxygenation capacity

 

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Quick Reference

A branch of physiology concerned with how the body adapts physiologically to the acute (short-term) stress of exercise or physical activity, and the chronic (long-term) stress of physical training. Exercise physiologists, for example, study how our bodies obtain energy from the food we eat and use the energy to initiate and sustain muscle activity. A sound knowledge of exercise physiology enables coaches and athletes to optimize the amount and type of training.

Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine — Sport and Leisure.


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