Overview

extended phenotype


'extended phenotype' can also refer to...

extended phenotype

extended phenotype

extended phenotype

extended phenotype

extended phenotype

extended phenotype n.

extended phenotype n.

On the Origins of Parasite-Extended Phenotypes

Pathophysiology of protein aggregation and extended phenotyping in filaminopathy

Phenotypically Continuous With Clinical Psychosis, Discontinuous in Need for Care: Evidence for an Extended Psychosis Phenotype

Introduction: The Extended Psychosis Phenotype—Relationship With Schizophrenia and With Ultrahigh Risk Status for Psychosis

The extended phenotype within the colony and how it obscures social communication

Direct Selection for Paraquat Resistance in Drosophila Results in a Different Extended Longevity Phenotype

Advantages and pitfalls of an extended gene panel for investigating complex neurometabolic phenotypes

Amino acid substitutions causing inhibitor resistance in TEM β-lactamases compromise the extended-spectrum phenotype in SHV extended-spectrum β-lactamases

Neurocognition in the Extended Psychosis Phenotype: Performance of a Community Sample of Adolescents With Psychotic Symptoms on the MATRICS Neurocognitive Battery

Activity of ketolide ABT-773 (cethromycin) against erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: correlation with extended MLSK phenotypes

Variations in the Prevalence of Strains Expressing an Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Phenotype and Characterization of Isolates from Europe, the Americas, and the Western Pacific Region

False extended-spectrum β-lactamase phenotype in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli associated with increased expression of OXA-1 or TEM-1 penicillinases and loss of porins

 

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The concept, advanced by British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in his 1982 book of the same title, that the phenotype of an organism extends beyond its body to encompass the organism's behaviour and the consequences of that behaviour. Dawkins cites a beaver's lake as an example. This manifestation of the beaver's instinctive dam-building activities is, he argues, an evolutionary adaptation just as much as, say, the beaver's coat, and is likewise subject to natural selection. Other instances include birds' nests, termite mounds, and spiders' webs.

Subjects: Psychology — Biological Sciences.


Reference entries
Authors

Richard Dawkins (b. 1941) English biologist


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