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external conversion


'external conversion' can also refer to...

external conversion

external conversion

Editorial - Conversion Coefficients for External Radiations

Organ dose conversion coefficients for external photon irradiation using the Chinese voxel phantom (CVP)

Dose conversion coefficients based on the Chinese mathematical phantom and MCNP code for external photon irradiation

Optimised geometry to calculate dose rate conversion coefficient for external exposure to photons

Selected organ dose conversion coefficients for external photons calculated using ICRP adult voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo code FLUKA

Organ dose conversion coefficients based on a voxel mouse model and MCNP code for external photon irradiation

Overview of the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external idealised exposures

Advice on the Implications of the Conversion Coefficients for External Radiations Published in ICRP Publication 74 and by ICRU Report 57

External dose-rate conversion factors of radionuclides for air submersion, ground surface contamination and water immersion based on the new ICRP dosimetric setting

Fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients for use in radiological protection of embryo and foetus against external exposure to protons from 100 MeV to 100 GeV

Estimated fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients for use in radiological protection of embryo and foetus against external exposure to photons from 50 keV to 10 GeV

Fluence to organ dose conversion coefficients calculated with the voxel model NORMAN-05 and the MCNPX Monte Carlo code for external monoenergetic photons from 20 keV to 100 MeV

 

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A process in which molecules in electronically excited states pass to a lower electronic state (which is frequently the ground state) by colliding with other molecules. In this process the electronic energy is eventually converted into heat. Since this process involves collisions, the rate at which it occurs depends on how frequently collisons occur. As a result, this process occurs much faster in liquids than in gases. It is sometimes called collision quenching.

Subjects: Chemistry.


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