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Faraday's laws


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Two laws describing electrolysis: (1) The amount of chemical change during electrolysis is proportional to the charge passed.(2) The charge required to deposit or liberate a mass m is given by Q = Fmz/M, where F is the Faraday constant, z the charge of the ion, and M the relative ionic mass.These are the modern forms of the laws. Originally, they were stated by Michael Faraday in a different form: (1) The amount of chemical change produced is proportional to the quantity of electricity passed.(2) The amount of chemical change produced in different substances by a fixed quantity of electricity is proportional to the electrochemical equivalent of the substance.

(1) The amount of chemical change during electrolysis is proportional to the charge passed.

(2) The charge required to deposit or liberate a mass m is given by Q = Fmz/M, where F is the Faraday constant, z the charge of the ion, and M the relative ionic mass.

(1) The amount of chemical change produced is proportional to the quantity of electricity passed.

(2) The amount of chemical change produced in different substances by a fixed quantity of electricity is proportional to the electrochemical equivalent of the substance.

Subjects: Physics — Chemistry.


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