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field of force


'field of force' can also refer to...

field of force

field of force

Non-ideal evolution of non-axisymmetric, force-free magnetic fields in a magnetar

Interlude: Of Force Fields and Rhythm Contours— David Spriggs’s Animate Sculptures

Time Evolution of Relativistic Force-Free Fields Connecting a Neutron Star and its Disk

On the interaction of internal gravity waves with a magnetic field – II. Convective forcing

On the interaction of internal gravity waves with a magnetic field – I. Artificial wave forcing

Performance of protein-structure predictions with the physics-based UNRES force field in CASP11

Simultaneous Detection of Near-field Topographic and Fluorescence Images of Human Chromosomes Via Scanning Near-field Optical/Atomic-force Microscopy (SNOAM)

Prediction of the structures of proteins with the UNRES force field, including dynamic formation and breaking of disulfide bonds

Investigation of force-freeness of a solar emerging magnetic field via application of the virial theorem to magnetohydrodynamic simulations

Simultaneous collection of topographic and fluorescent images of barley chromosomes by scanning near‐field optical/atomic force microscopy

Deterrence and the European Balance of Power: The Field Force and British Grand Strategy, 1934–1938

How best to include the effects of climate-driven forcing on prey fields in larval fish individual-based models

Prediction of protein loop structures using a local move Monte Carlo approach and a grid-based force field

Properties of the boundary integral equation for solar non-constant-α force-free magnetic fields

Music and image/image and music: the creation and meaning of visual-aural force fields in the later Middle Ages

 

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A field of force is said to exist when a force acts at any point of a region of space. A particle placed at any point of the region then experiences the force, which may depend on the position and on time. Examples are gravitational, electric and magnetic fields of force.

Subjects: Mathematics.


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