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Five Houses


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The designation given to five early important lineages of Chinese Ch'an Buddhism.of which only two, the Ts'ao-tung andLin-chi.survived more than a few generations. The term ‘Five Houses’ was first coined by Fa-yen Wen-i (885–958), founder of the latest of the ‘houses’ to appear. The five were as follows: (1) Kuei-yang was named after the two mountains (Kuei and Yang) where its headquarter temples were located. The founder was Kuei-shan Ling-yu (771–853). (2) Lin-chi, founded by Lin-chi I-hsüan (d. 866). (3) Ts'ao-tung, named after two mountains, Mt. Tung, home of the founder Tung-shan Liang-chieh (807–69), and Mt. Ts'ao, home of his disciple Ts'ao-shan Pen-chi (840–901). (4) Yün-men, founded by Yün-men Wen-yen (864–949). (5) Fa-yen, founded by Fa-yen Wen-i (885–958).

(1) Kuei-yang was named after the two mountains (Kuei and Yang) where its headquarter temples were located. The founder was Kuei-shan Ling-yu (771–853). (2) Lin-chi, founded by Lin-chi I-hsüan (d. 866). (3) Ts'ao-tung, named after two mountains, Mt. Tung, home of the founder Tung-shan Liang-chieh (807–69), and Mt. Ts'ao, home of his disciple Ts'ao-shan Pen-chi (840–901). (4) Yün-men, founded by Yün-men Wen-yen (864–949). (5) Fa-yen, founded by Fa-yen Wen-i (885–958).

Subjects: Buddhism.


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