Overview

Timothy Flint

(1780—1840)


Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

(1780–1840), Massachusetts missionary, whose Recollections of the Last Ten Years (1826), an account of his preaching pilgrimages in the Mississippi Valley, shows a firsthand acquaintance with the scenes used in his later novels. Francis Berrian; or, The Mexican Patriot (1826) is a romantic story of a New England Puritan in the Mexican revolution of 1822. George Mason, the Young Backwoodsman (1829) is a historical romance, and The Life and Adventures of Arthur Clenning (1828) is a fantastic tale of castaways in the South Seas and their later life on the Illinois frontier. The Shoshonee Valley (1830) tells the story of a New England mariner and his Chinese wife, who abandon civilization to live among the Indians. Flint was a professed follower of Chateaubriand, but, although he generally romanticizes the background, some of his writing on the Far West has a claim to realism. He also published The Western Monthly Review (1827–30), a literary journal interpreting the West, was the editor and probably largely the author of the Narrative of Pattie, and a popular Memoir of Daniel Boone (1833).

From The Oxford Companion to American Literature in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Literature.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.