Overview

fluid mechanics


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mechanics

hydrostatics

Blaise Pascal (1623—1662) French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher

hydrodynamics

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'fluid mechanics' can also refer to...

fluid mechanics

fluid mechanics

fluid mechanics

fluid mechanics

fluid mechanics

fluid mechanics

The equations of fluid mechanics

Fluid Mechanics and the SPH Method Theory and Applications

SOME REGULAR PERTURBATION SOLUTIONS IN FLUID MECHANICS

Two-Dimensional and Geophysical Fluid Mechanics

Cosmological fluid mechanics with adaptively refined large eddy simulations

The Fluid Mechanics of Arthropod Sniffing in Turbulent Odor Plumes

Fluid-like entropy and equilibrium statistical mechanics of self-gravitating systems

Varicocele, hypoxia and male infertility. Fluid Mechanics analysis of the impaired testicular venous drainage system

An Engineer Dissects Two Case Studies An Engineer Dissects Two Case Studies Hayles on Fluid Mechanics and MacKenzie on Statistics Hayles on Fluid Mechanics and MacKenzie on Statistics Philip A. Sullivan

DUNCAN, William Jolly (1894 - 1960), Mechan Professor of Aeronautics and Fluid Mechanics in the University of Glasgow since 1950

PRESTON, Joseph Henry (1911 - 1985), Professor of Fluid Mechanics, University of Liverpool, 1955–76, later Emeritus; Fellow, Queen Mary College, London, since December 1959

HINCH, Edward John (born 1947), Professor of Fluid Mechanics, University of Cambridge, 1998–2014; Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, since 1971

TOWNSEND, Albert Alan (1917 - 2010), Reader (Experimental Fluid Mechanics), Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 1961–85 (Assistant Director of Research, 1950–61); Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, since 1947

 

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A branch of mechanics concerned with the forces that fluids exert on objects that are in or moving through the fluids. The fluids most relevant to exercise and sport biomechanics are air and water.

Subjects: Physics — Sports and Exercise Medicine.


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