Overview

French Indo-China


'French Indo-China' can also refer to...

French Indo-China

French Indo-China

French Indo-China

French Indo-China

French Indo-China

French Indo-China War

French Indo-China War (1946–54)

French Indo-China War (1946–54)

Declaration respecting French Indo-China between France and Japan, signed at Paris, 19 August 1911

HOGG, John Drummond (1886 - 1937), HM Consul-General Saigon, French Indo-China since 1934

Agreement between China and France respecting a Parcel Post Service with Indo-China, signed 21 September 1911

Money Order Agreement between French Indo-China (France) and the Straits Settlements (Great Britain), signed at Hanoi/Singapore, 9 January/6 May 1911

Agreement between France and Japan relative to the Independence and Integrity of China and Declaration respecting French Indo-China, signed at Paris, 10 June 1907

Regulations annexed to the Revised International Telegraph Convention agreed between the Argentine Republic, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, Crete, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, British India, Netherlands Indies, French Indo-China, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Madagascar, Montenegro, Natal, the Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Norway, Persia, Portugal, Portuguese Colonies, Roumania, Russia, Senegal, Servia, Siam, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunis, Turkey and Uruguay, signed at London, 10 July 1903

Service Règlement annexed to the International Telegraph Convention between the Argentine Republic, Australia, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, Chile, Crete, Denmark, Egypt, Eritrea, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, British India, Dutch East Indies, French Indo-China, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Madagascar, Montenegro, Natal, the Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Norway, Orange Free State, Persia, Portugal and Colonies, Roumania, Russia, Senegal, Servia, Siam, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Transvaal, Tunis, Turkey and Uruguay, signed at Lisbon, 11 June 1908

International Radiotelegraph Convention between the Argentine Republic, Austria-Hungary and Bosnia-Herzegovina, Belgium and Belgian Congo, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Denmark, Egypt, France and Algeria, French West Africa, French Equatorial Africa, Indo-China, Madagascar and Tunis, Germany, Great Britain and British Colonies and Protectorates, the Union of South Africa, Australia, Canada, British India and New Zealand, Greece, Italy and Colonies, Japan and Corea, Formosa, Sakhalin and Kwantung Leased Territory, Morocco, Monaco, the Netherlands, Netherlands Indies and Curacao, Norway, Persia, Portugal and Colonies, Roumania, Russia and Possessions and Protectorates, San Marino, Siam, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, the United States and Uruguay, signed at London, 5 July 1912

Revision of the International Service Regulations annexed to the International Telegraph Convention of St. Petersburg of 22 July 1875, signed at Budapest between Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cape of Good Hope, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, British India, the Netherlands Indies, Indo-China, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Natal, New Caledonia, New South Wales, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Norway, Persia, Portugal, Portuguese Colonies, Queensland, Roumania, Russia, Senegal, Servia, Siam, South Australia, Spain, Spanish Colonies, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, Turkey, Victoria and West Australia

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Second World War
  • World History

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

Former French colonial empire in south-east Asia. Having gained early influence in the area through assisting Gia-Long in establishing the Vietnamese empire in the early 19th century, the French colonized the area between the late 1850s and 1890s, using the term Indo-China to designate the final union of their colonies and dependencies within Annam, Cambodia, Cochin-China, Laos, and Tonkin. Nationalist movements aiming particularly at the formation of an independent and united Vietnam sprang up between the wars, and French influence in the area was fatally undermined in the early 1940s by the collaboration of the Vichy colonial administration with the Japanese. The Vietminh resistance movement became active during the war; having consolidated a peasant base, it resisted attempts by the French to reassert their control after 1945. French rule ended after the French Indo-China War.

Subjects: Second World War — World History.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.