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general warrants


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general warrants

general warrants

general warrant

general warrants

general warrant

general warrant

general warrants

The General Warrant in Intellectual and Political Perspective, 1642–1700

Colonial Responses to the Controversies over Wilkes, General Warrants, and Writs of Assistance: The Widening Opposition to General Warrants

Colonial Thought Respecting Search, Seizure, and the Illegitimacy of General Warrants, to 17601

Part II The Emergence of the General Warrant as an Unreasonable Search and Seizure, Ch.6 The General Warrant in Intellectual and Political Perspective, 1642–1700

Part II The Emergence of the General Warrant as an Unreasonable Search and Seizure, Ch.8 Colonial Thought Respecting Search, Seizure, and the Illegitimacy of General Warrants, to 1760

Part V Developments in Search and Seizure, 1760–1776, Ch.21 Colonial Responses to the Controversies over Wilkes, General Warrants, and Writs of Assistance: The Widening Opposition to General Warrants

Part II The Emergence of the General Warrant as an Unreasonable Search and Seizure, Ch.10 Colonial Search Warrants and Their Enforcement, to 1760, in Relation to the Search Warrant Clause of the Fourth Amendment

Part II The Emergence of the General Warrant as an Unreasonable Search and Seizure, Ch.7 Search and Seizure in England, 1642–1700: The Legal Background to the English Critique of General Warrants

Search and Seizure in England, 1642–1700: The Legal Background to the English Critique of General Warrants

Part II The Emergence of the General Warrant as an Unreasonable Search and Seizure, Ch.5 English Thought on Search and Seizure, 1642–1700

Part II The Emergence of the General Warrant as an Unreasonable Search and Seizure, Ch.9 Colonial Legislation Regarding Search and Seizure, to 1760

Part II The Emergence of the General Warrant as an Unreasonable Search and Seizure, Ch.11 Colonial Searches by the Customs Services of England and Great Britain, to 1760

 

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Eighteenth‐cent. secretaries of state claimed a discretionary power in cases of seditious libel to issue general warrants for the arrest of persons unnamed. In 1763 Lord Halifax issued one for the apprehension of all connected with printing or publishing No. 45 of the North Briton. Forty‐nine persons were arrested, including Wilkes, author of the offending piece. But in December 1763 Chief Justice Pratt (Camden) declared general warrants illegal. The House of Commons confirmed the ruling in 1766, and in 1769 Wilkes won £4,000 damages from Halifax for wrongful arrest.

Subjects: Law — British History.


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