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Girl from Andros


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AT: The Lady/Woman from Andros A: Terence Pf: 166 bc, Rome Tr:c.1520 G: Latin com. in verse S: A street in Athens, before the houses of Simo and Glycerium, 2nd c. bc C: 9m, 3fAn Athenian gentleman, Simo, has arranged for his son Pamphilus to marry his neighbour's daughter. However, Pamphilus has already fallen in love with a foreign girl from Andros, Glycerium (who never appears in the play). Even though Simo learns that Glycerium is expecting Pamphilus' child, he insists on the arranged marriage going ahead in order to test the sincerity of his son's feelings. Davus, a slave, advises Pamphilus to agree to his father's plan, causing complications with Pamphilus' friend, who is in love with the neighbour's daughter. Pamphilus is on the point of marrying the wrong girl, when the wedding is cancelled because Glycerium has given birth to Pamphilus' child. It is now discovered that Glycerium is after all another long-lost daughter of the neighbour, so that she is free to marry Pamphilus, and Pamphilus' friend can marry his beloved.

AT: The Lady/Woman from Andros A: Terence Pf: 166 bc, Rome Tr:c.1520 G: Latin com. in verse S: A street in Athens, before the houses of Simo and Glycerium, 2nd c. bc C: 9m, 3f

Based on a no longer extant play of the same name by Menander, The Girl from Andros is the earliest of Terence's six comedies. Despite turning on the standard plot element of the long-lost child whose identity is improbably revealed at the end, the play has some quite sophisticated touches: the irony that Pamphilus, though unwilling to marry his neighbour's daughter, in fact ends up doing so; the scheme recommended by his slave that almost plunges him into misfortune; and the parallel plot, added to Menander's play by Terence, of the friend who wishes to wed the spurned bride. The play provided source material for the anonymously written The Buggbears (1564), Richard Steele's The Conscious Lovers, Daniel Bellamy's The Perjured Devotee (1739), and Edward Moore's The Foundling (1748).

Subjects: Literary Studies (Plays and Playwrights).


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