global governance

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A system of administrative supervision and decision making above the level of individual nations, intended to cope with problems that transcend national interests. In the mid-20th century, it was partially achieved under United Nations auspices with monetary systems and exchange rates, and through UN agencies, such as the United Nations Development Programme, the Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Health Organization, and the World Bank. Global governance works well in agreements on time zones, measuring units, many currency exchange rates, and international health regulations, but in most respects, many nations, especially the most powerful, put short-term national interests above the interests of the world as a whole.

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology.

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