Overview

Global Maritime Distress and Safety System


'Global Maritime Distress and Safety System' can also refer to...

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Maritime History

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

(GMDSS),

introduced by the International maritime organization in 1992, this forms part of the regulations laid down by the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. It broadcasts Marine Safety Information (MSI), such as weather warnings, automatically through Inmarsat and NAVTEX when previously such information had to be obtained manually. Its regulations apply to all passenger and cargo ships over 300 tonnes though smaller vessels are obliged to be equipped with its automated distress signals as it has now supplanted the system where a continuous radio watch on the three main international distress frequencies was kept by coast radio stations and certain ships.

GMDSS caters for three independent methods of relaying distress signals. (1) The EPIRB, the signals of which when activated are picked up by the COSPAS-SARSAT satellite system. This was originally developed by Russia (COSPAS) and the USA, Canada, and France (SARSAT). It currently (2004) has 45 ground stations and 23 mission control centres in over 30 countries. (2) Digital selective calling (DSC). (3) Inmarsat.

(1) The EPIRB, the signals of which when activated are picked up by the COSPAS-SARSAT satellite system. This was originally developed by Russia (COSPAS) and the USA, Canada, and France (SARSAT). It currently (2004) has 45 ground stations and 23 mission control centres in over 30 countries. (2) Digital selective calling (DSC). (3) Inmarsat.

See also amver; lifesaving.

GMDSS communications systems as at 2004

Subjects: Maritime History.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.