Graves Chamney Haughton

(1788—1849) orientalist

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Graves Chamney Haughton was born in Dublin and died in St Cloud near Paris on 28 August 1849. Educated in England, he obtained a cadetship in the East India Company army, departing for Bengal in 1808. He distinguished himself at Fort William College for remarkable proficiency in Hindustani, Arabic, Persian and Sanskrit, and was promoted lieutenant in 1814. Forced by ill-health to return to England the following year, he was appointed Assistant Oriental Professor in the East India College at Haileybury, where he came under the influence of the renowned Sanskritist Alexander Hamilton. Upon Hamilton's retirement in 1818, Haughton succeeded him to the Chair of Sanskrit and Bengali, a post he held until 1827. Haughton became a close friend of H.T. Colebrooke, assisting him in the formation of the Royal Asiatic Society in 1823, and supporting his interpretation of Ved nta philosophy against the attack of Colonel Vans Kennedy. His well-received publications lead to an honorary Oxford MA, election to the Royal Society, and membership of the Royal Society of Berlin, the Royal Irish Academy and the Asiatic Societies of Paris and Bengal. In 1832 he was a candidate for the Boden Professorship of Sanskrit at Oxford, where his withdrawal in favour of Horace Hayman Wilson, a former fellow student, occasioned a laudatory address signed by two hundred graduates of the university. Haughton was knighted in 1833.


From The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Philosophy.

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