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Heintz


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Swiss family of artists of Italian descent. The stone mason, sculptor and architect (1) Daniel Heintz I worked as foreman and master builder on the minsters of Basle and Berne. His son (2) Joseph Heintz I, the most important representative of the family, worked mainly as a painter, executing religious works and portraits, but in the last years of his life undertook architectural commissions. His brother (3) Daniel Heintz II succeeded their father as municipal master builder in Berne and also designed and directed work on buildings throughout Calvinist Switzerland. In contrast, Joseph Heintz II (b Augsburg, c. 1600; d Venice, 24 Sept 1678), son of Joseph Heintz I, used his talents as a painter in the service of the Counter-Reformation, though he is best known for his depictions of Venetian festivities and ceremonies. His son Daniel Heintz III (1640–1709) also worked in Venice, as did his daughter Regina Heintz II (c. 1646–before 1709), to whom no works have been definitely attributed.(1) Daniel Heintz I (b Alagna Valsesia, c. 1530–35; d Berne, before 1 Dec 1596). Mason, sculptor, architect and engineer. Although originally from northern Italy, he was active in Switzerland, and he was granted citizenship in Basle on 27 November 1559. A year later he and his wife Katharina took a house in the Rittergasse, a select quarter, which points to a degree of prosperity. As a master builder, architect and sculptor he was much in demand by both the civic authorities and the wealthier citizens. He worked for a number of private clients in Basle, but many of his commissions came from the city council, for which he constructed, in the interior of the Rathaus, a stone spiral staircase with a stairwell in a rich, Late Gothic style and a figure of Justice (completed 1581). He was probably also responsible for the design and execution of the Geltenzunfthaus (Winetraders’ Guildhall; completed 1578) and may have been involved in other municipal buildings in Basle. In 1580 he worked on a stone altar-table for Basle Minster.

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From The Grove Encyclopedia of Northern Renaissance Art in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Renaissance Art.



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