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hydraulic resistance


'hydraulic resistance' can also refer to...

hydraulic resistance

hydraulic resistance

Hydraulic resistance of developing Actinidia fruit

Whole-plant hydraulic resistance and vulnerability segmentation in Acer saccharinum

Variable hydraulic resistances and their impact on plant drought response modelling

Incorporation of transfer resistance between tracheary elements into hydraulic resistance models for tapered conduits

Distribution of xylem hydraulic resistance in fruiting truss of tomato influenced by water stress

Hydraulic resistance components of mature apple trees on rootstocks of different vigours

Estimation of conduit taper for the hydraulic resistance model of West et al.

Getting variable xylem hydraulic resistance under control: interplay of structure and function

Recovery performance in xylem hydraulic conductivity is correlated with cavitation resistance for temperate deciduous tree species

Hydraulic efficiency and coordination with xylem resistance to cavitation, leaf function, and growth performance among eight unrelated Populus deltoides×Populus nigra hybrids

Developmental control of xylem hydraulic resistances and vulnerability to embolism in Fraxinus excelsior L.: impacts on water relations

Further insights into the components of resistance to Ophiostoma novo-ulmi in Ulmus minor: hydraulic conductance, stomatal sensitivity and bark dehydration

External Pressures Based on Leaf Water Potentials Do Not Induce Xylem Sap to Flow at Rates of Whole Plant Transpiration from Roots of Flooded or Well-drained Tomato and Maize Plants. Impact of Shoot Hydraulic Resistances

 

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A measure of the resistance offered by a material, such as vegetation, to a flow of water. The calculation of flow velocities within stream channels and over hillslopes cannot be made without accounting for the hydraulic resistance experienced by flow over different morphologies (Smith et al. (2007) PPG31, 4). Moore and Burch characterize hydraulic resistance by choosing an appropriate value of the Manning roughness coefficient, and it can also be characterized using the Darcy–Weisbach friction factor, expressed as a function of the Reynolds number of the flow; see Prosser and Rustomji (2000) PPG24, 2 for the equations. Fisher et al. (2007) Glob. Change Biol. 13, 11 recommend the introduction of hydraulic resistance to likely flow paths in the management of forests.

Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography.


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