Overview

inorganic chemistry


'inorganic chemistry' can also refer to...

inorganic chemistry

inorganic chemistry

inorganic chemistry

inorganic chemistry

inorganic chemistry

inorganic chemistry

inorganic chemistry

Advanced Structural Inorganic Chemistry

Problems in Structural Inorganic Chemistry

The Chemical Bond in Inorganic Chemistry The Bond Valence Model

The Chemical Bond in Inorganic Chemistry

EVANS, Dennis Frederick (1928 - 1990), Professor in Inorganic Chemistry, Imperial College, London, since 1981

ANDERSON, John Stuart (1908 - 1990), Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, Oxford University, 1963–75, now Emeritus

FISCHER, Ernst Otto (1918 - 2007), Emeritus Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, Munich Technical University

EDWARDS, Peter Philip (born 1949), Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Oxford, since 2003 (Head of Inorganic Chemistry, 2003–13); Fellow of St Catherine’s College, Oxford, since 2003

TURNER, James Johnson (born 1935), Research Professor in Chemistry, University of Nottingham, 1995–97, now Emeritus (Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, 1979–95)

SHELDRICK, George Michael (born 1942), Professor of Structural Chemistry (formerly of Inorganic Chemistry), University of Göttingen, 1978–2011, now Emeritus

GREEN, Malcolm Leslie Hodder (born 1936), Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, 1989–2003, now Emeritus, and Head of Department, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, 1988–2003, University of Oxford; Fellow of St Catherine’s College, Oxford, 1988–2003, now Emeritus

BRISCOE, Henry Vincent Aird (1888 - 1961), University Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, Imperial College, Royal College of Science, 1932–54, Professor Emeritus, 1954; Fellow of Imperial College of Science and Technology, 1958; Director of the Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratories, 1938–54

 

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The branch of chemistry concerned with compounds of elements other than carbon. Certain simple carbon compounds, such as CO, CO2, CS2, and carbonates and cyanides, are usually treated in inorganic chemistry.

Subjects: Chemistry.


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