Overview

Japanization


'Japanization' can also refer to...

Japan

Japanese

Japan

Japanese

Japan

Japan

Japan

Japanese

Japan

Japan

Japan

Japan

Japan

Japan

japan

Japan

Japan Paragon of Energy Efficiency, Green Growth Laggard

Japan Ongoing Financial Deregulation, Structural Change, and Performance, 1990–2010

Japan

Japan

 

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Is the term used to describe changes in Western industry that involve the adoption of techniques of managing and organizing production that were developed by Japanese-owned companies in Japan. In particular, it centres on the use of production techniques such as just-in-time that require particular forms of external buyer-supplier relations and internal work organization, such as teamworking and kaizen. The term has been criticized for: (a) assuming that there is one ‘Japanese way of managing’ when in Japan there is a diverse range of strategies; (b) obscuring the viewpoint that the techniques are new methods of management control that have more to do with the conflict between management (capital) and employees (labour) than with that between nations; (c) overstating the extent of change and failing to acknowledge developments in the West, such as Total Quality Management or functional flexibility, that share similarities with the supposed Japanese model. Whilst accepting some of these criticisms, the main proponents of Japanization, organization theorists Nick Oliver and Barry Wilkinson, argue that the term remains an appropriate shorthand to describe the changes in UK industries that depend on ideas of organizing and managing transferred from Japan.

(a) assuming that there is one ‘Japanese way of managing’ when in Japan there is a diverse range of strategies; (b) obscuring the viewpoint that the techniques are new methods of management control that have more to do with the conflict between management (capital) and employees (labour) than with that between nations; (c) overstating the extent of change and failing to acknowledge developments in the West, such as Total Quality Management or functional flexibility, that share similarities with the supposed Japanese model.

Subjects: Human Resource Management.


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