Overview

John, The Letters of.


'John, The Letters of.' can also refer to...

John, The Letters of

The Letters of John Clare

The Letters of John Clare

Repentance in the Letters of SS Barsanuphius and John of Gaza

JOHN NICHOLS, JOHNSON'S PREFACES, AND THE HISTORY OF LETTERS

John Cleland and the Marquis of Rockingham: Two New letters

The Letters and Diaries of John Henry Newman. Vol. XXXII: Supplement

The Letters and Diaries of John Henry Newman Gerald Tracey

The Letters and Diaries of John Henry Newman, Vol. 32: Supplement

Letters from Queer Street: Being Some of the Correspondence of the Late Mr John Mason (1908)

Letters from Queer Street: Being Some of the Correspondence of the Late Mr John Mason

Kindred & Related Spirits: the Letters of John Muir and Jeanne C. Car

The Letters and Diaries of John Henry Newman, Vol. 26: Aftermaths: January 1872 to December 1873 January 1872 to December 1873

The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: The Correspondence of John Locke: In Eight Volumes, Vol. 2: Letters Nos. 462–848

The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: The Correspondence of John Locke: In Eight Volumes, Vol. 5: Letters Nos. 1702–2198

The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: The Correspondence of John Locke: In Eight Volumes, Vol. 6: Letters Nos. 2199–2664

The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: The Correspondence of John Locke: In Eight Volumes, Vol. 4: Letters Nos. 1242–1701

The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: The Correspondence of John Locke: In Eight Volumes, Vol. 1: Introduction; Letters Nos. 1–461

The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: The Correspondence of John Locke: In Eight Volumes, Vol. 8: Letters Nos. 3287–3648

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Biblical Studies

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

Three NT Epistles which tradition ascribes to St John, the Apostle and author of the Fourth Gospel. Modern scholars who defend the apostolic authorship of the Gospel commonly also admit that of the First Epistle; among those who reject it, opinion is divided. The Second and Third Epistles were not generally admitted as authentic in antiquity, and many modern critics assign them to a different author from that of the First Epistle.

The First Epistle reflects many of the themes of the Fourth Gospel, and the writer stresses the continuity of Christian tradition and experience. ‘False brethren’ are denounced for denying that Jesus Christ ‘has come in the flesh’, as well as for flouting the demands of righteousness and love. The author urges the ideal of sinless perfection in language that suggests that Christians cannot, and presumably therefore do not, sin, but there are equally emphatic statements that we do sin, and need and receive forgiveness. Some scholars infer that there must have been more than one writer; others ascribe the awkwardness to the need to attack contradictory positions. The Second Epistle insists on the need to profess right doctrine and avoid communion with the teachers of error, and the Third on hospitality.

On 1 Jn. 5: 7 f. see Johannine Comma.

Subjects: Biblical Studies.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.