Overview

joint injury


'joint injury' can also refer to...

joint injury

joint injury

Injuries to the distal radioulnar joint

Dislocations and joint injuries in the hand

Bone and joint injuries—wrist and forearm

Bone and joint injuries of the hand

Adam's Outline of Fractures (Including Joint Injuries)

Incidence of acute kidney injury following total joint arthroplasty: a retrospective review by RIFLE criteria

Michael Mason Prize WinnerI39 Kicking Osteoarthritis: How does Joint Injury Cause Osteoarthritis?

Injury and joint hypermobility syndrome in ballet dancers—a 5-year follow-up

Factors Associated with Osteoarthritis of the Hip and Knee in Hong Kong Chinese: Obesity, Joint Injury, and Occupational Activities

Cytokines and Joint Injury. Edited by W. B. van den Berg and P. Miossec. €149.80. Birkhäuser, Basel-Boston-Berlin, 2004. 296 pp. ISBN 3-7643-7001-7.

Calculation of cerebral perfusion pressure in the management of traumatic brain injury: joint position statement by the councils of the Neuroanaesthesia and Critical Care Society of Great Britain and Ireland (NACCS) and the Society of British Neurological Surgeons (SBNS)

FISHER, Alfred George Timbrell (1888 - 1967), Surgeon, specialist in injuries and diseases of bones, joints and spine; Fellow of American and of International College of Surgeons; Fellow Royal Society of Medicine; Orthopædic Specialist to Rheumatic Unit, St Stephen’s Hospital and to Charterhouse Rheumatism Clinic; Co-Trustee and Member, Executive, Empire Rheumatism Council; Corresponding Member of American Academy of Orthopædic Surgeons

 

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Quick Reference

Physical damage (such as a sprain, dislocation, or stiffness) to a joint. Sometimes an injury may result in loose bodies, called joint mice, occurring in a joint. These can cause locking and may require surgery. Joint injuries, unlike many muscle injuries, may require absolute rest and immobilization (fixation of the joint to prevent movement). In such cases, any damaged ligaments are kept unstressed while the joint is moved passively by someone else to keep the surrounding muscles fit.

Subjects: Medicine and Health.


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