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Kingdom of Heaven


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Kingdom of Heaven

KINGDOM OF HEAVEN

Kingdom of Heaven

Contesting the Kingdom of Heaven Rachel as Counterpart to Christ

The Kingdom of Heaven and the Church of Christ

The Kingdom of Heaven and the Church of Christ

Parable IV. The Kingdom of Heaven compared with leaven

Wu Leichuan, Christianity and Chinese Culture, and the Kingdom of Heaven

Secular vs. Orthodox Chaplaincy: Taking the Kingdom of Heaven Seriously

Secular vs. Orthodox Chaplaincy: Taking the Kingdom of Heaven Seriously

Parable III. The Kingdom of Heaven compared to a grain of mustard-seed

Parable V. The Kingdom of Heaven compared with a treasure hidden in a field

Parable VI. The Kingdom of Heaven compared with a merchant seeking good pearls

Parable VII. The Kingdom of Heaven compared with a net cast into the sea

Rejoice, for the Kingdom of Heaven is at Hand! A Deconstruction of the Inaugural Message in the Words of Pope Francis

Parable II. The Kingdom of Heaven compared with a man who sowed good seed in his field

Kingdom of Heaven. Directed and produced by Ridley Scott; written by William Monahan. United States. 2005; color; 145 minutes. Distributed by Twentieth‐Century Fox (Scott Free Productions)

The Works of Thomas Traherne. Volume I: Inducements to Retirednes. A Sober View of Dr Twisses his Considerations. Seeds of Eternity or the Nature of the Soul. The Kingdom of God. Volume II: Commentaries of Heaven, Part 1: Abhorrence to Alone. Volume III: Commentaries of Heaven, Part 2: Al-Sufficient to Bastard. Volume IV: Church’s Year Book, Meditations and Devotions from the Resurrection to All Saints’ Day. A Serious and Pathetical Contemplation of the Mercies of God, in Several Most Devout and Sublime Thanksgivings for the same. (Meditations on the Six Days of the Creation). Edited by Jan Ross.

 

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Heb. Malkhut Shamayyim, the Rabbinic expression for the sovereignty of God as acknowledged by human beings; hence the frequent expression: ‘acceptance of the yoke of the Kingdom of Heaven’. The Mishnah (Berakhot 2: 2) understands the reading of the Shema to be the ‘acceptance of the yoke of the Kingdom of Heaven’. The kingly metaphor is found in the Bible in the verse: ‘The Lord shall reign for ever and ever’ (Exodus 15: 18) and in the verse: ‘And the Lord shall be king over all the earth: in that day shall the Lord be One and His name one’ (Zechariah 14: 9). Both these verses are recited at the end of the Alenu prayer which looks forward to the day ‘when the world will be perfected under the kingdom of the Almighty, and all the children of flesh will call upon Thy name’.

Solomon Schechter rightly detects three aspects of the Kingdom of God: 1. the personalistic and individualistic, the acceptance of the yoke, as when reading the Shema; 2. the universalistic, in which the establishment of the Kingdom over all is the hoped-for Messianic event; and 3. the nationalistic, in which the people of Israel is redeemed from subservience to earthly rulers to worship God in freedom. In the Kabbalistic doctrine of the Sefirot, the lowest of the Sefirot is Malkhut, ‘Sovereignty’, the divine principle by which the world is governed.

Subjects: Judaism and Jewish Studies.


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