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labour power


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'labour power' can also refer to...

labour power

labour power

labour power

labour power

labour-power

Labour in Power

Globalization, labour power and partisan politics revisited

Britain: Left Abandoned? New Labour in Power

Constitutional Reform, New Labour in Power and Public Trust in Government

Power, Participation, and Political Renewal: Theoretical Perspectives on Public Participation under New Labour in Britain

Review: Manipulating Hegemony: State Power, Labour and the Marshall Plan in Britain
 Rhiannon Vickers Manipulating Hegemony: State Power, Labour and the Marshall Plan in Britain

Growth and income distribution with the dynamics of power in labour and goods markets

Money and labour-power: Marx after Hegel, or Smith plus Sraffa?

The Labour Party in Britain and Norway: Elections and the Pursuit of Power Between the Wars. By David Redvaldsen.

Should the EU Have the Power to Set Minimum Standards for Collective Labour Rights in the Member States?

A neo-Kaleckian–Goodwin model of capitalist economic growth: monopoly power, managerial pay and labour market conflict

Childbirth and the Long-Term Division of Labour within Couples: How do Substitution, Bargaining Power, and Norms affect Parents’ Time Allocation in West Germany?

Janet Greenlees. Female Labour Power: Women Workers' Influence on Business Practices in the British and American Cotton Industries, 1780–1860. (Studies in Labour History.) Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate. 2007. Pp. xx, 244. $99.95

David Redvaldsen. The Labour Party in Britain and Norway: Elections and the Pursuit of Power between the World Wars. (International Library of Political Studies, number 50.) New York: I. B. Tauris. 2011. Pp. xxiv, 206. £56.50

 

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Quick Reference

Is a term coined by Karl Marx in Capital and refers to the capacity of workers to work. Marx held that when employers hired workers in the labour market they were effectively buying this capacity to work rather than work itself. For this reason, the employment relationship is indeterminate and the actual amount of work produced for each unit of wages is variable and dependent on the success of the employer in managing workers within the labour process. [See porosity and Marxism.]

Subjects: Human Resource Management.


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