Overview

John Lamb

(1735—1800)


'John Lamb' can also refer to...

Lamb, John

Lamb, John

John Lamb (1789—1850) college head and dean of Bristol

LAMB, John (1871 - 1952)

Lamb, Christopher John (1950-2009), plant biochemist

Lamb, John (born 1933), double bass player

LAMB, William John (1906 - 1993), Royal Navy, retired

Lamb, John (1789-1850), college head and dean of Bristol

Reed, John Lamb (1916-2010), actor and singer

LAMB, John Cameron (1845 - 1915), Knight of Grace of St John of Jerusalem, 1911

LAMB, John Edward Stewart (1892 - 1954), Political Liaison Officer, Tanganyika Territory, since 1947

LAMB, Christopher John (1950 - 2009), Director, John Innes Centre, and John Innes Professor of Biology, University of East Anglia, since 1999

The Worst Enemy of Science? Essays in Memory of Paul Feyerabend. John Preston, Gonzalo Munévar, David Lamb

LAMB, John (1922 - 1991), James Watt Professor of Electrical Engineering, since 1961, and Vice-Principal, 1977–80, University of Glasgow

MORRISON, John Lamb Murray (1906 - 2001), DSc; FREng, FIMechE; Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, 1971 (Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 1946–71)

LAMB, John (1886 - 1974), Parish Minister of Crathie, Aberdeenshire, 1937–63; Domestic Chaplain to the Queen, in Scotland, 1952–64, Extra Chaplain since 1964

LAMB, Trevor David (born 1948), Distinguished Professor, 2008–11, now Emeritus Professor, and Research Director, ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science, 2006–10, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University (ARC Federation Fellow, 2003–07)

 

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(1735–1800) Revolutionary War officer, born in New York City. Lamb participated in the Canadian invasion of 1775 and the defense of an army depot in Connecticut; served as commander of artillery at West Point (1779–80) and as surveyor of ordnance (1779–80); and commanded the heaviest bombardment at the siege of Yorktown (1781). He was an early leader in the New York Sons of Liberty and led mobs that unloaded provisions destined for the British troops in Boston, closed New York Harbor, and seized weapons and other military stores.

From The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Warfare and Defence.


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