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Lindsay


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Vachel Lindsay (1879—1931)

Lindsay Jones

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Family of Australian artists. The members included five of the ten children of Dr R. C. Lindsay (an Irish-born surgeon) of Creswick, Victoria: PercyLindsay (1870–1952), painter and graphic artist; SirLionelLindsay (1874–1961), art critic, watercolour painter, and graphic artist in pen, etching, and woodcut, who helped to create an interest in the collection of original prints in Australia; NormanLindsay (b Creswick, 22 Feb. 1879; d Springwood, NSW, 21 Nov. 1969), painter, graphic artist, sculptor, critic, and novelist; RubyLindsay (1885–1919), graphic artist; and SirDarylLindsay (1889–1976), painter and director of the National Gallery of Victoria from 1942 to 1956. Norman's son Raymond (1904–60) and Daryl's wife Joan (1896–1984) were also painters. For over half a century this family, through one or other of its members, played a leading role in Australian art. The most interesting character among them was Norman Lindsay, who according to Robert Hughes (The Art of Australia, 1970) ‘has some claim to be the most forceful personality the arts in Australia have ever seen’. He believed that the main impulse of art and life was sex, and his work was often denounced as pornographic. However, when he saw some of Lindsay's paintings at an exhibition of Australian art in London in 1923, Sir William Orpen commented that they were ‘certainly vulgar, but not in the least indecent. They are extremely badly drawn, and show no sense of design and a total lack of imagination.’ Lindsay's output as an artist—in various media—was enormous and he was also a prolific writer of fiction and non-fiction. His novels include Age of Consent (1935), in which the central character is an artist based loosely on himself. A film adaptation appeared in 1969, and a fictionalized version of Lindsay appears in another film, Sirens (1994), which was shot largely at his home, Springwood in New South Wales, now a museum dedicated to him. His son JackLindsay (1900–90) was a writer who settled in England in 1926. His books include several biographies of major artists.

Subjects: Art.


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