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liquefaction of gases


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The conversion of a gaseous substance into a liquid. This is usually achieved by one of four methods or by a combination of two of them: (1) by vapour compression, provided that the substance is below its critical temperature; (2) by refrigeration at constant pressure, typically by cooling it with a colder fluid in a countercurrent heat exchanger; (3) by making it perform work adiabatically against the atmosphere in a reversible cycle; (4) by the Joule-Thomson effect. Large quantities of liquefied gases are now used commercially, especially liquefied petroleum gas and liquefied natural gas.

(1) by vapour compression, provided that the substance is below its critical temperature; (2) by refrigeration at constant pressure, typically by cooling it with a colder fluid in a countercurrent heat exchanger; (3) by making it perform work adiabatically against the atmosphere in a reversible cycle; (4) by the Joule-Thomson effect.

Subjects: Chemistry — Physics.


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