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Stephen Lote

(fl. 1381—1417)


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(fl. 1381–d. 1417 or 1418).

English mason. He was warden under Yeveley of the lodge of St Paul's Cathedral, London (1381–2). He worked with Yeveley on the tombs of King Richard II (reigned 1377–deposed 1399) and his first Queen (Anne of Bohemia (1366–94) in Westminster Abbey (1394–5). In 1400 he became the King's Master-Mason at Westminster and the Tower of London, and worked at Canterbury Cathedral, Kent, where he completed the nave, built the cloisters, continued work on the transepts, and probably designed the pulpitum (c.1410) and tomb of King Henry IV (reigned 1399–1413). He carried out works at Maidstone Church, Kent, and Rochester Bridge in the same county. He may have designed the choir (destroyed) of Fotheringhay Church, Northants. Lote made the tomb of Edward, Duke of York (killed at Agincourt, 1415), for Fotheringhay (destroyed), and also, with Yeveley, the tomb of Simon Langham, Archbishop of Canterbury (d. 1376), in Westminster Abbey (1390s). He is also referred to as a ‘latoner’, indicating he made monumental funerary brasses as well as stone tombs.

J. Harvey (1987)

Subjects: Architecture.


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