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Lycosidae


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'Lycosidae' can also refer to...

Lycosidae

Lycosidae

FAMILY LYCOSIDAE • Wolf Spiders

Sexual advertisement and immune function in an arachnid species (Lycosidae)

Avoidance of Wolf Spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae) by Striped Cucumber Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae): Laboratory and Field Studies

Factors Initiating Emigration of Two Wolf Spider Species (Araneae: Lycosidae) in an Agroecosystem

Patterns in the Distribution of Two Wolf Spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae) in Two Soybean Agroecosytems

Presampling sensory information and prey density assessment by wolf spiders (Araneae, Lycosidae)

Diving Behavior in Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae): Avoidance of a Predacious Wolf Spider (Araneae: Lycosidae) in Relation to Life Stage and Water Depth

Chemical Cues from an Introduced Predator (Mantodea, Mantidae) Reduce the Movement and Foraging of a Native Wolf Spider (Araneae, Lycosidae) in the Laboratory

Influence of Crop Management and Environmental Factors on Wolf Spider Assemblages (Araneae: Lycosidae) in an Australian Cotton Cropping System

Nonconsumptive Predator–Prey Interactions: Sensitivity of the Detritivore Sinella curviseta (Collembola: Entomobryidae) to Cues of Predation Risk From the Spider Pardosa milvina (Araneae: Lycosidae)

Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Used To Analyze Predation of Nilaparvata lugens (Homoptera: Delphacidae) by Pirata subpiraticus (Araneae: Lycosidae)

Fitness costs and benefits of antipredator behavior mediated by chemotactile cues in the wolf spider Pardosa milvina (Araneae: Lycosidae)

Intraspecific Variation in the Thermal Biology of Rabidosa rabida (Araneae: Lycosidae) (Walckenaer) From the Mountains of Arkansas

 

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; order Araneae, suborder Araneomorphae)

Family of medium to large spiders that run over the ground hunting for their prey. Some genera are burrowing (up to 1 m deep) and others make funnel-shaped webs. Females carry their egg cocoons, which can be quite large, attached to their circularly arranged spinnerets.

Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences.


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