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Malcolm I

(d. 954) king in Scotland


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Donald II (d. 900)

Constantine II (d. 952) king in Scotland

Constantine III (d. 411) Roman emperor proclaimed in Britain

Strathclyde

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'Malcolm I' can also refer to...

Malcolm I (d. 954)

Malcolm I (d. 954)

Malcolm I (d. 954)

Malcolm I (943–54)

Malcolm I (d. 954)

Malcolm I [Mael Coluim mac Domnaill] (d. 954), king in Scotland

Selected Essays of Malcolm Bowie, I: Dreams of Knowledge; II: Song Man

The Uses and Abuses of British Political Fiction or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Malcolm Tucker1

Donald Malcolm Reid. Whose Pharaohs? Archaeology, Museums, and Egyptian National Identity from Napoleon to World War I. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. 2002. Pp. xv, 409. $35.00

Fundamental Virology, 4th Edition By David M. Knipe, Peter M. Howley, Diane E. Griffin, Robert A. Lamb, Malcolm A. Martin, Bernard Roizman, and Stephen E. Straus Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2001. 1408 pp. $99.95 (cloth).Fields Virology, 4th Edition, Volumes I and II By David M. Knipe, Peter M. Howley, Diane E. Griffin, Robert A. Lamb, Malcolm A. Martin, Bernard Roizman, and Stephen E. Straus Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2001. 3280 pp. $339.00 (cloth)

Hay, William Montagu (1826 - 1911), DL, Hereditary Chamberlain of Dunfermline; Lord High Commissioner to General Assembly of Church of Scotland, 1889–92, 1896–97; [William de Haya was Butler to Malcolm IV and William the Lion; 1st Baron’s father was Ambassador to England from Robert III and the Regent, Duke of Albany; 2nd Baron fell at Flodden, 1513; 4th Baron was captured at Pinkie, 1547; 1st Earl of Tweeddale commanded a regiment for Charles I; 1st Marquis became Lord Chancellor of Scotland after the Revolution; 2nd Marquis likewise in 1704; 4th Marquis held the last appointment as Extraordinary Lord of Session; 8th Marquis served in the Peninsular War, was present at the battle of Vittoria (gold medal), and at Busaco, where he was wounded, 1810; became Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Madras]

 

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S. of Donald II; king of Scots 943–54; d. Fetteresso, 954; bur. Iona(?).

Malcolm succeeded to the Scottish kingship when his long-reigning cousin Constantine II retired to St Andrews in 943. The struggles between the West Saxons and Scots for overlordship of Bernicia, and Wessex and Dublin for control of Scandinavian York, dominated his reign. Edmund of Wessex acknowledged Malcolm's overlordship of Strathclyde–Cumbria in return for defending northern England from back-door Viking attack (945), and Malcolm's plunder of the Bernicians as far south as the Tees in 949 was connected with Olaf Sihtricsson's attempt to regain York from Erik Bloodaxe. He was careful not to upset the alternating system of succession in Scotland, so appointed Constantine II's son Indulf as sub-king of Strathclyde and tanist (heir), who thus became his successor. Malcolm was slain by the men of Moray at Fetteresso (south of Aberdeen).

Subjects: British History.


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