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managerialism


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Is an approach to work that emphasizes the objectives of the business above all other concerns. It is often used in connection with public sector and voluntary organizations, since they are not primarily profit driven, and might legitimately be focused on a variety of social and ethical objectives. For example, a doctor in a hospital might make a decision whether to administer a drug based on the needs of the patient and in line with the ethics of the medical profession. If, however, the doctor was to base the decision on the cost of the drug and how this would affect the hospital's budget, he or she might be accused of being managerialist (and even unprofessional). Private-sector professionals (such as accountants, research scientists and corporate lawyers) can also face similar dilemmas of balancing business objectives with professional concerns. For some people, managerialism will therefore be considered an insult; other people will see it as a compliment because it suggests focused dedication to business needs.

Subjects: Human Resource Management.


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