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media events


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'media events' can also refer to...

media events

media events

media events

Events in Media

Sports: media events and masculine discourse

Martyrdom, Memory, and the “Media Event” VISIONARY WRITING AND CHRISTIAN APOLOGY IN SECOND-CENTURY CHRISTIANITY

(Re)Media Events: Remixing War on YouTube

World Media Event: It's About Time: Cultural History at the Millennium Approach: cultural studies

Inferring User Situations from Interaction Events in Social Media

Mega-events and mediatisation: between old and new media

Erratum: A correction to ‘A new moment-tensor decomposition for seismic events in anisotropic media’

A new moment-tensor decomposition for seismic events in anisotropic media

The digital age, media sport and mega-events: piracy and symbiosis in the cultural industries

From Protest to Agenda Building: Description Bias in Media Coverage of Protest Events in Washington, D.C.*

Radial artery intima-media thickness predicts major cardiovascular events in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

Common carotid intima-media thickness measurement is not a pertinent predictor for secondary cardiovascular events after coronary bypass surgery. A prospective study

Carotid intima–media thickness and the risk of new vascular events in patients with manifest atherosclerotic disease: the SMART study

Dramatic Real-world Events and Public Opinion Dynamics: Media Coverage and its Impact on Public Reactions to an Assassination

Frame Competition After Key Events: A Longitudinal Study of Media Framing of Economic Policy After the Lehman Brothers Bankruptcy 2008–2009

 

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Exceptional happenings organized with the cooperation of the media by governments, public bodies, or commercial concerns, typically broadcast live across several channels with regular programming suspended to accommodate them. The sociologists Katz and Daniel Dayan (b.1943) identify three forms: firstly, there are ‘conquests’: associated with an authority, charismatic figure, or major achievement such as the moon landings, climbing Everest, or the running of the four-minute mile. Secondly, ‘coronations’; official state events that are celebrations of tradition, such as presidential inaugurations or the crowning, marriages, or funerals of monarchs. And thirdly, ‘contests’: public trials such as the Oliver North hearings or the O. J. Simpson murder trial. See also event; news events; compare pseudo-event.

Subjects: Media Studies.


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