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military Bands


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This term is used in Britain to describe either an actual army (or naval or air‐force) band or for one on the same model, i.e. comprising both brass and woodwind instr. The composition of such bands varies widely in different countries, and even in different regimental or other units of the same country. One common Brit. combination is as follows: (a) 1 picc. (or fl., or both); 1 ob.; 1 small cl., 12–14 ordinary cl., 2 bass cl.; 1 alto and 1 ten. sax; 2 bn. (b) 4 hn., 2 bars., 2 euphoniums, 4 basses (bombardons). (c) 4 cornets; 2 tpt.; 3 tb. (d) 2 drummers with a variety of perc. instr. Sometimes, when conditions of perf. allow, 1 or 2 str. db. may appear, as an alternative to the same number of bass wind instr. Bands in USA vary from the above scheme merely in detail.

(a) 1 picc. (or fl., or both); 1 ob.; 1 small cl., 12–14 ordinary cl., 2 bass cl.; 1 alto and 1 ten. sax; 2 bn. (b) 4 hn., 2 bars., 2 euphoniums, 4 basses (bombardons). (c) 4 cornets; 2 tpt.; 3 tb. (d) 2 drummers with a variety of perc. instr.

The score and parts of the military band, unlike those of the brass band, employ the ordinary orch. system of notation. The term ‘wind band’ is used in USA.

Subjects: Music.


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