Overview

military press


'military press' can also refer to...

military press

military press

“Deserted His Majesty's Service”: Military Runaways, The British-American Press, and the Problem of Desertion During the Seven Years' War

Japan and Greater China: Political Economy and Military Power in the Asian Century. Greg Austin and Stuart Harris. University of Hawaii Press, 2001, 320 pp

Michael S. Neiberg. Making Citizen Soldiers: Rotc and the Ideology of American Military Service. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 2000. Pp. viii, 264. $39.95

Edward J. Shultz. Generals and Scholars: Military Rule in Medieval Korea. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press. 2000. Pp. xii, 254. $26.95

Louis Fisher. Nazi Saboteurs on Trial: A Military Tribunal and American Law. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. 2003. Pp. xi, 193. $29.95

Peter Stanley. White Mutiny: British Military Culture in India. New York: New York University Press. 1998. Pp. xiv, 314. $40.00

William M. Hammond. Reporting Vietnam: Media and Military at War. (Modern War Studies.) Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. 1998. Pp. xi, 362. $34.95

Albert Isaac Slomovitz. The Fighting Rabbis: Jewish Military Chaplains and American History. New York: New York University Press. 1999. Pp. xiii, 171. $35.00

Scott Hughes Myerly. British Military Spectacle: From The Napoleonic Wars through the Crimea. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 1996. Pp. x, 293. $35.00

Nina Berman. Impossible Missions? German Economic, Military, and Humanitarian Efforts in Africa. (Texts and Contexts.) Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. 2004. Pp. x, 271

Robert Buzzanco. Masters of War: Military Dissent and Politics in the Vietnam Era. New York: Cambridge University Press. 1996. Pp. xiv, 386. $29.96

S. P. Mackenzie. The Home Guard: A Military and Political History. New York: Oxford University Press. 1995. Pp. xiv, 262. $29.95

John France. Victory in the East: A Military History of the First Crusade. New York: Cambridge University Press. 1994. Pp. xv, 425. $54.95

NICOLA DI COSMO, editor. Military Culture in Imperial China. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 2009. Pp. x, 445. $45.00

Camouflage Isn't Only for Combat: Gender, Sexuality, and Women in the Military. By Melissa Herbert. New York University Press, 1998. 204 pp

Matthew Moten. The Delafield Commission and the American Military Profession. (Texas A&M University Military History Series, number 67.) College Station: Texas A&M University Press. 2000. Pp. xvii, 270. $47.95

Harold R. Winton and David R. Mets, editors. The Challenge of Change: Military Institutions and New Realities, 1918–1941. (Studies in War, Society, and the Military.) Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. 2000. Pp. xix, 246. $50.00

 

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A strength-training exercise in which a weighted barbell is pushed upwards from the chest a number of times; the up-and-down movement is called a pressing action because it puts pressure on the chest muscles. The military press helps to strengthen the deltoids, pectorals, and triceps muscles (figure 41)

▪ Lift the weighted barbell up to your shoulders, breathing in as you do so. As with all lifts, keep your back straight and use your legs to execute the movement. Hold the barbell on your shoulders for a few seconds and breathe out. Then lift the weights above your head by fully extending your arms. Hold for a few seconds. Gently lower the barbell to your chest then immediately push up again. Repeat the pressing action about four times before slowly lowering the barbell to the ground. Remember to continue breathing throughout the exercise; at no time should you hold your breath.

▪ Lift the weighted barbell up to your shoulders, breathing in as you do so. As with all lifts, keep your back straight and use your legs to execute the movement. Hold the barbell on your shoulders for a few seconds and breathe out. Then lift the weights above your head by fully extending your arms. Hold for a few seconds. Gently lower the barbell to your chest then immediately push up again. Repeat the pressing action about four times before slowly lowering the barbell to the ground. Remember to continue breathing throughout the exercise; at no time should you hold your breath.

Figure 41

Subjects: Medicine and Health.


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