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Mirandolina


'Mirandolina' can also refer to...

 

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AT: Mistress of the Inn; Mine Hostess; The Inn Keeper A: Carlo Goldoni Pf: 1753, Venice Pb: 1753 Tr: 1922 G: Com. in 3 acts; Italian prose S: Mirandolina's inn, Florence, mid-18th c. C: 5m, 3fMirandolina, a clever, beautiful, and charming landlady, is wooed by two of her guests, a poor Marquis and a rich Count, while her servant Fabrizio has also fallen prey to her charms. It was her late father's wish that she should marry Fabrizio. Offered status by the Marquis and lavish presents by the Count, she devotes herself to running the inn, until she turns her attention to the Baron of Ripafratta. He is a confessed woman-hater, who ignores the attentions of two actresses purporting to be aristocrats, and so represents a challenge to Mirandolina. With feminine wiles she wins the heart of the Baron, then forces him publicly to deny his feelings for her and declares that she will marry Fabrizio. The Baron storms off, and Mirandolina reflects that as a married woman she will now have to abandon her flirtatious behaviour.

AT: Mistress of the Inn; Mine Hostess; The Inn Keeper A: Carlo Goldoni Pf: 1753, Venice Pb: 1753 Tr: 1922 G: Com. in 3 acts; Italian prose S: Mirandolina's inn, Florence, mid-18th c. C: 5m, 3f

In attempting to reform the Italian theatre, Goldoni abandoned the improvisation, predictability, and knockabout farce of the commedia dell'arte and replaced it with plays whose main interest lies in character relationships. In Mirandolina he created one of the most vibrant figures of Italian theatre, a woman who overcomes her humble background to enchant a trio of aristocrats with her charm and intelligence. Surprisingly, however, she does not use this to improve her social standing but merely to teach these men a lesson. She gives her heart and hand to the honest commoner Fabrizio.

Subjects: Literary Studies (Plays and Playwrights).


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