Overview

Nice declaration on sport


'Nice declaration on sport' can also refer to...

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Sport and Leisure

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

The recognition by the European Council, in a declaration made at Nice, France, in 2000, of the special characteristics of European sport. This followed on from a full consultation paper by the European Commission's Directorate General X, in 1998, in which the fivefold (educational, health-related, social, cultural, and recreational) functions of sport were recognized, and in particular the pyramid model of European sport (from the apex, the European, down to the broad base of the grass-roots, via the national and the regional). The declaration is as follows:The European Council has noted the report on sport submitted to it by the European Commission in Helsinki in December 1999 with a view to safeguarding current sports structures and maintaining the social function of sport within the European Union. Sporting organisations and the Member States have a primary responsibility in the conduct of sporting affairs. Even though not having any direct powers in this area, the Community must, in its action under the various Treaty provisions, take account of the social, educational and cultural functions inherent in sport and making it special, in order that the code of ethics and the solidarity essential to the preservation of its social role may be respected and nurtured.There had been an emotive commitment to amateur participation in debate, the European Commission's sport representative Marcelino Oreja arguing that, in Europe, sporting amateurs displayed a ‘genuine, disinterested love in taking part in sport’. These arguments and formulations developed over the decade and culminated in the European Council's ‘Declaration on Sport’ published in December 2008, with four clauses: ‘The European Council recognises the importance of the values attached to sport, which are essential to European society. It stresses the need to take account of the specific characteristics of sport, over and above its economic dimension.’ The third clause talked of the continuing promotion of dialogue through the European Sport Forum. And finally: ‘It calls for the strengthening of…dialogue with the International Olympic Committee and representatives of the world of sport, in particular on the question of combined sports training and education for young people.’ This, the culmination of a decade of debate, lobbying, and campaigning, was the fifth appendix in this document, following appendices on defence, the Middle East, and Zimbabwe. In such pan-European policy-making, the journey from the grandiose to the bland is not unusual: the key words in the 2008 appendix/declaration are ‘essential’ and ‘specific characteristics’—but what these words really refer to remains as elusive, and contestable, as ever.

The European Council has noted the report on sport submitted to it by the European Commission in Helsinki in December 1999 with a view to safeguarding current sports structures and maintaining the social function of sport within the European Union. Sporting organisations and the Member States have a primary responsibility in the conduct of sporting affairs. Even though not having any direct powers in this area, the Community must, in its action under the various Treaty provisions, take account of the social, educational and cultural functions inherent in sport and making it special, in order that the code of ethics and the solidarity essential to the preservation of its social role may be respected and nurtured.

[...]

Subjects: Sport and Leisure.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.