Overview

occupational health care


'occupational health care' can also refer to...

occupational health care

occupational health care

The perceptions of occupational health in primary care

Economic evaluation of occupational health and safety programmes in health care

Chickenpox ARDS in a health care worker following occupational exposure

Occupational exposure to body fluids among health care workers in Georgia

Substance misuse among health care workers: national survey of occupational physicians

A survey of occupational skin disease in UK health care workers

Agents and trends in health care workers’ occupational asthma

Quality Improvement by Means of ‘Differential’ Occupational Health Care: An Experiment in a Regional Occupational Health Centre

Opinions on alcohol-related issues among professionals in primary, occupational, and specialized health care

An audit of occupational health care for employees with low-back pain

Exploring the need for an occupational health service for those working in primary care

Coming to the end of the road in occupational health—lessons from cancer care

Unrecognized abrasions and occupational exposures to blood-borne pathogens among health care workers in Turkey

Offering physical activity counselling in occupational health care—does it reach the target group?

An assessment of occupational health care in the Netherlands (1996–2005)

Occupational injury among full-time, part-time and casual health care workers

Occupational Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Health Care Workers in a University Hospital in Lima, Peru

 

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Quick Reference

Is the provision of health and medical services by the employer at the place of work. In large companies, it is common to have an occupational health centre with full-time medical staff and smaller companies sometimes band together to provide group occupational health services. The original purposes of occupational health were to identify and control work-related injuries and diseases and reduce time lost through absenteeism. Additionally, however, it may be used to promote the general health and well-being of the workforce, and many organizations, in agreement with trade unions, have established ‘well man’ and ‘well woman’ clinics that provide health checks and advice on healthy living. [See health education, stress management, and well-being.]

Subjects: Human Resource Management.


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