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okra


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Also known as gumbo, bamya, bamies, and ladies' fingers; edible seed pods of Hibiscus esculentus (syn. Abelmoschus esculentis). Small ridged mucilaginous pods containing numerous round seeds, originally West African, now widely grown in subtropical regions, and used in soups and stews. There are two varieties: gomba are oblong, bamya are round. A 100‐g portion (raw) is a rich source of vitamin C; a good source of calcium; a source of carotene (500 µg), vitamin B1, and folate; contains 4 g of dietary fibre; supplies 30 kcal (125 kJ).

Rainy season okra is A. caillei, aibikia is A. manihot, and musk seed or ambrette is A. moschatus.

Subjects: Medicine and Health — Cookery, Food, and Drink.


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