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Paraguayan War


'Paraguayan War' can also refer to...

Paraguayan War (1864–70)

Paraguayan War (1864–70)

War to the Death in Paraguay

Paraguayan War (War of the Triple Alliance)

The Paraguayan War and Brazilian National Identity

Brazil and the Paraguayan War: Conflicts and Interests

Illustrating Race and Nation in the Paraguayan War Era Exploring the Decline of the Tupi Guarani Warrior as the Embodiment of Brazil

HENDRIK KRAAY and THOMAS L. WHIGHAM, editors. I Die with My Country: Perspectives on the Paraguayan War, 1864–1870. (Studies in War, Society, and the Military.) Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. 2004. Pp. x, 257. $69.95

Convention concerning the Laws and Customs of War on Land between the Argentine Republic, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Mexico, Montenegro, the Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Persia, Peru, Portugal, Roumania, Russia, El Salvador, Servia, Siam, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela, signed at The Hague, 18 October 1907

Convention respecting the Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers and Persons in War on Land between the Argentine Republic, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Mexico, Montenegro, the Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Persia, Portugal, Rou mania, Russia, El Salvador, Servia, Siam, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela, signed at The Hague, 18 October 1907

Convention respecting Bombardments by Naval Forces in Time of War between the Argentine Republic, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Mexico, Montenegro, the Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Persia, Peru, Portugal, Roumania, Russia, El Salvador, Servia, Siam, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela, signed at The Hague, 18 October 1907

Convention for the Adaptation of the Principles of the Geneva Convention to Maritime War between the Argentine Republic, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, China, Colombia, Cuba, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Mexico, Montenegro, the Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Persia, Peru, Portugal, Roumania, Russia, El Salvador, Servia, Siam, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela, signed at The Hague, 18 October 1907

Convention relative to Certain Restrictions on the Right of Capture in Maritime War between the Argentine Republic, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Den mark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Persia, Peru, Portugal, Roumania, El Salvador, Servia, Siam, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela, signed at The Hague, 18 October 1907

Convention respecting the Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers in Maritime War between the Argentine Republic, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Mexico, Montenegro, the Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Persia, Peru, Portugal, Roumania, Russia, El Salvador, Servia, Siam, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Uruguay and Venezuela, signed at The Hague, 18 October 1907

 

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(1864–70)

A conflict resulting from rivalries between Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil, and Argentina. The Paraguayan President Francisco Solano López, alarmed by Brazilian intervention in Uruguay and harbouring desires for Paraguayan territorial expansion and access to the sea, initiated hostilities against Brazil in 1864. Despite traditional rivalry between Brazil and Argentina, the latter joined Brazil and its puppet government in Uruguay in the Triple Alliance pact (May 1865) against Paraguay. Paraguay's well-trained army of 600,000 men did not prove equal to the task, and López's death in March 1870 ended one of the most destructive wars in Latin American history. In addition to losing more than half of its population, Paraguay was also stripped of considerable territory as a result of the war.

Subjects: World History.


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