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perceptual memory


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'perceptual memory' can also refer to...

perceptual memory n.

perceptual memory n.

Perceptual organization and pitch memory

Perceptual Learning and Memory in Visual Search

Sensory-perceptual episodic memory and its context: autobiographical memory

Memory systems in primates: episodic, semantic, and perceptual learning

Perceptual Versus Conceptual Memory Processes in a Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)

Untangling Perceptual Memory: Hysteresis and Adaptation Map into Separate Cortical Networks

Perceptual Constraints on Implicit Memory for Visual Features: Statistical Learning in Human Infants

Combining disruption and activation techniques to map conceptual and perceptual memory processes in the human brain

Priming of Motion Direction and Area V5/MT: a Test of Perceptual Memory

The effects of divided attention on perceptual and conceptual memory test performances: A process dissociation framework

Demystifying Wine Expertise: Olfactory Threshold, Perceptual Skill and Semantic Memory in Expert and Novice Wine Judges

Memory performance on two implicit perceptual tasks from the twenties through the eighties

The effects of age and gender on perceptual and conceptual implicit memory

It's in the Eye of the Beholder: Spatial Language and Spatial Memory Use the Same Perceptual Reference Frames

Conceptual and Perceptual Similarity Between Encoding and Retrieval Contexts and Recognition Memory Context Effects in Older and Younger Adults

Flexible, Capacity-Limited Activity of Posterior Parietal Cortex in Perceptual as well as Visual Short-Term Memory Tasks

Residual memory deficits after recovery from severe traumatic brain injury: dissociation of priming of perceptual identification from recognition of word stimuli

 

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Long-term memory for visual, auditory, and other perceptual information, including memory for people's faces and voices, the appearance of buildings, familiar tunes, the flavours of particular foods and drinks, and so on. Stored information of this type does not fall into the category of episodic memory, and it is therefore often included in semantic memory, but this is avoided in careful usage because it is not (and in some cases cannot be) encoded in words. It should not be confused with sensory memory.

Subjects: Psychology.


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