Overview

peripheral resistance


'peripheral resistance' can also refer to...

peripheral resistance

total peripheral resistance

Resistance Training in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease Effects on Myosin Isoforms, Fiber Type Distribution, and Capillary Supply to Skeletal Muscle

Transient diabetes mellitus and peripheral insulin resistance following Tacrolimus intoxication in a child after renal transplantation.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Proviral DNA from Peripheral Blood and Lymph Nodes Demonstrates Concordant Resistance Mutations to Zidovudine (Codon 215) and Didanosine (Codon 74)

Serum uric acid (UA) in cachectic and non-cachectic chronic heart failure (CHF) patients – Relation to peripheral vascular resistance (PVR)

The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I-axis in patients with advanced chronic heart failure: Evidence for a peripheral growth hormone resistance

Use of Peripheral Blood DNA for Genotype Antiretroviral Resistance Testing in Drug-Naive HIV-Infected Subjects

Increased counteracting effect of eNOS and nNOS on an α1-adrenergic rise in total peripheral vascular resistance in spontaneous hypertensive rats

Tezosentan (an intravenous endothelin receptor A/B antagonist) reduces peripheral resistance and increases cardiac power therefore preventing a steep decrease in blood pressure in patients with congestive heart failure

Despite High Concordance, Distinct Mutational and Phenotypic Drug Resistance Profiles in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 RNA Are Observed in Gastrointestinal Mucosal Biopsy Specimens and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Compared with Plasma

EXPRESSION OF THE MULTDORUG RESISTANCE GLYCOPROTEIN 170 IN THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS PATIENTS. THE PERCENTAGE OF LYMPHOCYTES EXPRESSING GLYCOPROTEIN 170 IS INCREASED IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH PREDNISOLONE

 

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Quick Reference

A measure of the opposition encountered by the blood as it flows through blood vessels. It is the sum of all the regional individual resistances to arterial blood as it passes through the many and varied circuits to body organs and tissues. Peripheral resistance is caused by friction between the blood and the walls of blood vessels. It varies inversely to the fourth power of the radius of the vessel. Thus, if the radius is halved, resistance increases 16-fold enabling substantial blood flow changes to be effected by relatively small adjustments to the radius of the vessels (see shunting). Peripheral resistance is an important indicator of cardiovascular fitness. Physical training can favourably and significantly lower total peripheral resistance, reducing the load on the heart.

Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine.


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