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Plains Indians


'Plains Indians' can also refer to...

Plains Indians

Plains Indians

Plains Indians

Plains Indians Wars

Plains Indians wars

Plains Indians wars

Plains Indian Wars (1854–90)

Representing Plains Indian Sign Language

Contrary Neighbors: Southern Plains and Removed Indians in Indian Territory

War Dance at Fort Marion: Plains Indian War Prisoners

The Rise and Fall of Plains Indian Horse Cultures

Correlates of Receipt of Colorectal Cancer Screening among American Indians in the Northern Plains

Elliott West. The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers, and the Rush to Colorado. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. 1998. Pp. xxiv, 422. $34.95

The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers, & the Rush to Colorado. By Elliott West. (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998. xxiv, 422 pp. $34.95, ISBN 0-7006-0891-5.)

Plains Indian History and Culture: Essays on Continuity and Change. By John C. Ewers. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. xxiv, 272 pp. $29.95, ISBN 0-8061-2862-3.)

The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers, and the Rush to Colorado. By Elliott West. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998. xxiv + 422 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. $34.95

The Wichita Indians: Traders of Texas and the Southern Plains, 1540–1845. By F. Todd Smith. (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2000. xiv, 206 pp. $32.95, ISBN 0-89096-952-3.)

The Plains Indians. By Paul H. Carlson. (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1998. xiv, 254 pp. Cloth, $29.95, ISBN 0-89096-828-4. Paper, $15.95, ISBN 0-89096-817-9.)

Paul H. Carlson. The Plains Indians. (Elma Dill Russell Spencer Series in the West and Southwest, number 19.) College Station: Texas A&M University Press. 1998. Pp. xii, 254. Cloth $29.95, paper $15.95

 

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General term applied to the many tribes that lived in the Plains and Prairie regions. Their more or less homogeneous culture was based economically on the hunting of bison, although some of the eastern tribes also grew maize. Principally nomadic, they used dogs and later horses for transportation, and were noted for their vigorous and constant warfare and for their mystical pursuit of visions and supernatural power. The popular conception of the heroic Indian brave—tall, muscular, and dignified, with braided hair, costume of skins, and feathered headdress, living in tepees and skilled in horsemanship—derives from contact with the Plains tribes. Among the most prominent of these were the Sioux, Comanche, Cheyenne, Pawnee, Black-foot, Osage, and Mandan. The Plains Indians figure in the writings of Cooper, Neihardt, Garland, Parkman, and Lewis and Clark, in Longfellow's Hiawatha and novels and nonfiction by Mari Sandoz, as well as in the more scientific descriptions by School-craft, Catlin, Grinnell, Dorsey, and Wissler.

Subjects: Literature — World History.


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