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price war


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'price war' can also refer to...

price war

price war

price war

price war

price war

price war

The Price War The Fight for the National Market, 1930–1950

The Price of Freedom: Americans at War

Extreme Weather and Civil War: Does Drought Fuel Conflict in Somalia through Livestock Price Shocks?

SOUL MADE FLESH: THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR AND THE MAPPING OF THE MIND
 Carl Zimmer
 2004. London: Heinemann
 Price £17.99. ISBN 0434010464

Contemporaries' opinions of the Allied and Central Powers' performance during the First World War: measuring turning points in perception with sovereign debt prices

Lloyd C. Gardner. Pay Any Price: Lyndon Johnson and the Wars for Vietnam. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee. 1995. Pp. xv, 610. $35.00

Drug War Politics: The Price of Denial. By Eva Bertram, Morfis Blachman, Kenneth Sharpe, and Peter Andreas. University of California Press. 1996. 347 pp. Paper

David H. Price. Cold War Anthropology: The CIA, the Pentagon, and the Growth of Dual Use Anthropology.

Kosovo: War and Revenge By Tim Judah. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000. Pp. xx, 348. Price PB £12.95. 0–300–08354–8.

Jihad: The Origin of Holy War in Islam By Reuven Firestone (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), 206 pp. Price HB £17.99. ISBN 0–19–512580–0.

Pay Any Price: Lyndon Johnson and the Wars for Vietnam. By Lloyd C. Gardner. (Chicago: Dee, 1995. xviii, 610 pp. $35.00, ISBN 1-56663-087-8.)

Elliot S. Valenstein. The War of the Soups and Sparks: The Discovery of Neurotransmitters and the Dispute over How Nerves Communicate. New York, Columbia University Press, 2005. 256 pp. (No price given).

Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals. By Gary Jonathan Bass. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2000. ix + 402 pp. No price stated

 

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Quick Reference

Charging low prices to harm competitors' profits. In a price war one or more firms charge prices below those that would maximize their own profits, to inflict losses on rivals. A price war may aim to punish competitors for breaking a cartel agreement, to weaken their finances in order to force acceptance of a takeover bid, or to drive them out of business completely.

Subjects: Business and Management — Economics.


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