Overview

Print Renaissance


Related Overviews

Fritz Glarner (1899—1972)

Larry Rivers (1923—2002)

Jasper Johns (b. 1930) American painter, sculptor, and printmaker

Robert Rauschenberg (1925—2008) American artist

See all related overviews in Oxford Index » »

 

'Print Renaissance' can also refer to...

Print Renaissance

Print Renaissance

Rewriting Arthurian Romance in Renaissance France: From Manuscript to Printed Book

Review: Gender, Rhetoric and Print Culture in French Renaissance Writing

Printed Commonplace-Books and the Structuring of Renaissance Thought

What Did Renaissance Readers Write in their Printed Copies of Chaucer?

Review: Managing Readers: Printed Marginalia in English Renaissance Books

Josquin des Prez, Renaissance Historiography, and the Cultures of Print

The Renaissance Computer: Knowledge Technology in the First Age of Print

Rosa Salzberg. Ephemeral City: Cheap Print and Urban Culture in Renaissance Venice.

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric, and Law

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric, and Law

Review: Gender, Rhetoric, and Print Culture in French Renaissance Writing
 Floyd Gray Gender, Rhetoric, and Print Culture in French Renaissance Writing

Rewriting Arthurian Romance in Renaissance France: From Manuscript to Printed Book. By Jane H. M. Taylor.

The Print Collection of Ferdinand Columbus (1488–1539): A Renaissance collector in Seville

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric, and Law, by Lyndan Warner

Ephemeral City: Cheap Print and Urban Culture in Renaissance Venice, by Rosa Salzberg

Caroline Goeser. Picturing the New Negro: Harlem Renaissance Print Culture and Modern Black Identity. (CultureAmerica.) Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. 2007. Pp. xiv, 360. $34.95

Ann Moss. Printed Commonplace-Books and the Structuring of Renaissance Thought. New York: Clarendon Press of Oxford University Press. 1996. Pp. ix, 345. $80.00

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Art

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

Term sometimes used to describe an upsurge of interest in printmaking among American artists from the late 1950s. It was characterized by the opening of several workshops specializing in the creation of high-quality artists' prints, the first of which (producing lithographs) was Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE) at West Islip on Long Island, New York, set up in 1957 by the Russian-born Tatyana Grosman (1904–82). Her friends Fritz Glarner and Larry Rivers were among the first to work there; they were followed by Jasper Johns (1960), Robert Rauschenberg (1962), and other well-known artists. In 1960 the most famous establishment of the Print Renaissance—the Tamarind Lithography Workshop—was established in Los Angeles (it is named after a street there) by June Wayne (1918– ), a painter, printmaker, designer, and writer. She had received a grant from the Ford Foundation to set up a workshop that would be organized on an apprenticeship system, through which experienced lithographers would work with students who would in turn, it was hoped, become master lithographers. In addition, practising artists were given two-month fellowships to work there. The Workshop flourished in Los Angeles until 1970 and then was transferred to the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque as the Tamarind Institute. During its decade in Los Angeles, 104 artists held fellowships, including Sam Francis and Louise Nevelson. Among the successful Tamarind graduates was Kenneth Tyler (1931– ), who in 1966 was one of the founders of Gemini GEL (Graphics Editions Ltd) in Los Angeles. In 1967 it produced Rauschenberg's six-feet-high Booster, the largest lithograph ever printed up to that date. It was not only lithography that figured in the Print Renaissance: screenprinting became popular in the early 1960s, and the Crown Point Press in Oakland, California, established by Kathan Brown in 1962, encouraged the use of intaglio processes such as etching.

Further Reading

R. Castelman, Prints of the 20th Century (1988)

Subjects: Art.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.