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public interest disclosure


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1. the expression of concern about performance or competence that is privileged at law by virtue of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998. The statute provides that where an employee acts in good faith in questioning the behaviour or performance of another member of staff or an organization, he or she should be protected from such penalties as disciplinary procedures, suspension, or dismissal. See also whistle-blowing. 2. circumstances in which confidentiality can be breached because there is a serious risk of physical harm to an identifiable individual or individuals. The basis on which confidentiality can be breached in the public interest were defined in the case of W v Egdell, in which the court held that the risk had to be of physical harm to identifiable person(s) and must not be merely ‘fanciful’. Where there is a serious risk of physical harm to a specific person, there is an entitlement but not a duty to breach confidentiality, and the General Medical Council requires that doctors must be prepared to justify their decision either way.

1. the expression of concern about performance or competence that is privileged at law by virtue of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998. The statute provides that where an employee acts in good faith in questioning the behaviour or performance of another member of staff or an organization, he or she should be protected from such penalties as disciplinary procedures, suspension, or dismissal. See also whistle-blowing. 2. circumstances in which confidentiality can be breached because there is a serious risk of physical harm to an identifiable individual or individuals. The basis on which confidentiality can be breached in the public interest were defined in the case of W v Egdell, in which the court held that the risk had to be of physical harm to identifiable person(s) and must not be merely ‘fanciful’. Where there is a serious risk of physical harm to a specific person, there is an entitlement but not a duty to breach confidentiality, and the General Medical Council requires that doctors must be prepared to justify their decision either way.

Subjects: Medicine and Health.


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