Overview

rasa


'rasa' can also refer to...

RASA Affect and Intuition in Javanese Musical Aesthetics

Rasa

Rasa

Rasa

Rasa

Rasa

Rasa

rasa

rasa

Rasa

Rasa The Bane of Indian Aesthetics

RASA

rasa

Tabula rasa

Bhayānaka Rasa

rasa (T.)

Rasa Kalpadruma

Rasa Kaumudi

Rasa Manjari

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Hinduism

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

A term originating in aesthetic theory (an early discussion is in Bharata's Nāṭyaśāstra), where it designates an impersonal and universalized experience, or ‘mood’, of joy and bliss, which is created in an audience out of the principal emotions (bhāvas (1)) evoked in a drama. Although rasa in itself is a single, ineffable experience of entrancement or aesthetic rapture, it is subdivided for analytical purposes according to the principal feelings which evoke it. There are said to be eight such emotions—love (rati), laughter (hāsa), sorrow (śoka), energy (utsāha), anger (krodha), fear (bhaya), disgust (jugupsā), and amazement (vismaya)—which engender eight corresponding rasa—the erotic (śṛṅgāra), comic (hāsya), pathetic (karuṇa), heroic (vīra), furious (raudra), fearful (bhayānaka), grotesque (bībhatsa), and wondrous (adbhuta). Through his commentary on Nāṭyaśāstra, Abhinavagupta developed a sophisticated theory of aesthetics which regarded rasa as a distinct mode of experience situated between ordinary awareness and enlightenment, although it differs from the latter only in degree. The concept was also imported into the bhakti environment of Gauḍīya, and other Vaiṣṇava devotional movements, where the bhāva (2) of erotic love, such as that experienced by the gopīs and Rādhā, is thought to be salvific when experienced through the associated rasa of pure bliss.

Subjects: Hinduism.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.