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Relatively Speaking


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Relatively Speaking

Relatively Speaking An Account of the Relationship between Language and Thought in the Color Domain

Relatively Speaking (1967)

 

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AT: Meet My Father A: Alan Ayckbourn Pf: 1967, London Pb: 1968 G: Com. in 2 acts S: London bedsit, and patio of house in the country, 1960s C: 2m, 2fAlerted by mysterious phone calls, gifts of flowers, chocolates in the drawer, and men's slippers under the bed, Greg, who has known Ginny for a month, now suspects her of having an affair. She claims she is going to visit her parents, but refuses to take Greg with her. Greg proposes to her, but she asks for time to decide. Greg leaps into a taxi, armed with the address of Ginny's destination, and heads for the country. Philip and Sheila have a somewhat strained marriage, and when Sheila seems to be trying to get Philip out of the house, he suspects that she has a lover. When Greg arrives unexpectedly, Philip's fears are confirmed, especially when Greg says that he hopes to marry ‘her’ soon. Ginny arrives, intending to break off her affair with Philip; horrified to find Greg there, she quickly introduces Philip as her father. When Greg talks of Ginny's affair with a married man, Sheila realizes that he must be referring to Philip, who was once Ginny's boss. Philip almost blackmails Ginny into coming on a business trip with him, but Sheila forces him to turn this into a honeymoon for Ginny and Greg. Greg leaves, still imagining he has spent the day with his bride's parents.

AT: Meet My Father A: Alan Ayckbourn Pf: 1967, London Pb: 1968 G: Com. in 2 acts S: London bedsit, and patio of house in the country, 1960s C: 2m, 2f

Originally premiered in Scarborough in 1965 as Meet My Father, Relatively Speaking was written ‘to make people laugh when their seaside summer holidays were spoiled by the rain’. Transferring to London as his first major success, this deftly constructed play characteristically probes beneath the laughter to expose the pain, boredom, and deception in Philip and Sheila's marriage. Sadly too, the young couple are ‘quite wrong for each other of course’.

Subjects: Literary Studies (Plays and Playwrights).


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Authors

Alan Ayckbourn (b. 1939) English dramatist


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