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retinal cone


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'retinal cone' can also refer to...

retinal cone

retinal cone

retinal cone

retinal cone

Migraine photophobia originating in cone-driven retinal pathways

Effects of Retinal Detachment on S And M Cone Function In An Animal Model

Differential requirements for retinal degeneration slow intermolecular disulfide-linked oligomerization in rods versus cones

Functional analysis of cone–rod homeobox (CRX) mutations associated with retinal dystrophy

Mutations in the Retinal Guanylate Cyclase (RETGC-1) Gene in Dominant Cone-Rod Dystrophy

NLRP3 inflammasome activation drives bystander cone photoreceptor cell death in a P23H rhodopsin model of retinal degeneration

In conditions of limited chromophore supply rods entrap 11-cis-retinal leading to loss of cone function and cell death

In conditions of limited chromophore supply rods entrap 11-cis-retinal leading to loss of cone function and cell death

In conditions of limited chromophore supply rods entrap 11-cis-retinal leading to loss of cone function and cell death

Functional characterization of missense mutations at codon 838 in retinal guanylate cyclase correlates with disease severity in patients with autosomal dominant cone–rod dystrophy

Excess cone cell proliferation due to lack of a functional NR2E3 causes retinal dysplasia and degeneration in rd7/rd7 mice

Cone photoreceptors are the main targets for gene therapy of NPHP5 (IQCB1) or NPHP6 (CEP290) blindness: generation of an all-cone Nphp6 hypomorph mouse that mimics the human retinal ciliopathy

Excess cones in the retinal degeneration rd7 mouse, caused by the loss of function of orphan nuclear receptor Nr2e3, originate from early-born photoreceptor precursors

Determining consequences of retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase (RetGC1) deficiency in human Leber congenital amaurosis en route to therapy: residual cone-photoreceptor vision correlates with biochemical properties of the mutants

 

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The photoreceptor cells essential for colour vision and high acuity vision, present in large numbers in the fovea. In the human eye there are three types of cones, differentially sensitive to particular wavelengths of light depending on the opsin variant expressed. The first is most sensitive at long wavelengths (564–580 nm, yellow), the second to medium wavelengths (534–545 nm, green), and the third to shorter wavelengths (420–440 nm, violet). Neural processing allows a full spectrum of colours to be perceived. See colour blindness; compare retinal rod.

Subjects: Medicine and Health.


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