Overview

Robertsonian translocation


'Robertsonian translocation' can also refer to...

Robertsonian translocation

Robertsonian translocation

Robertsonian Translocations

Robertsonian translocation

Robertsonian translocation

Micro-evolution in grasshoppers mediated by polymorphic Robertsonian translocations

Chromosomal segregation in spermatozoa of 14 Robertsonian translocation carriers

PGD for reciprocal and Robertsonian translocations using array comparative genomic hybridization

Robertsonian translocations—reproductive risks and indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis

Assisting reproduction of infertile men carrying a Robertsonian translocation

Breakpoint Diversity Illustrates Distinct Mechanisms for Robertsonian Translocation Formation

The origin of a Robertsonian chromosomal translocation in house mice inferred from linked microsatellite markers.

A molecular strategy for routine preimplantation genetic diagnosis in both reciprocal and Robertsonian translocation carriers

Apoptosis and meiotic segregation in ejaculated sperm from Robertsonian translocation carrier patients

PGD in female carriers of balanced Robertsonian and reciprocal translocations by first polar body analysis

Meiotic segregation of rare Robertsonian translocations: sperm analysis of three t(14q;22q) cases

Ultrastructural studies of spermatozoa from infertile males with Robertsonian translocations and 18, X, Y aneuploidies

Rare Robertsonian translocations and meiotic behaviour: sperm FISH analysis of t(13;15) and t(14;15) translocations: A Case Report

Homozygosity for a Robertsonian Translocation (13q;14q) in an Otherwise Healthy 44, XY Man With a History of Repeated Fetal Losses

 

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A nonreciprocal chromosomal translocation in which the long arms of two nonhomologous acrocentric chromosomes are attached to a single centromere and the short arms to another. The two short arms often disappear at a subsequent division. Robertsonian translocations in humans are confined to the acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22, the short arms of which have no essential genetic material.

Subjects: Medicine and Health — Chemistry.


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