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Richard Schubert

(1885—1959)


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(b Dessau, 15 Dec 1885; d Oberstaufen, 12 Oct 1959). German tenor. He studied with Rudolf von Milde and made his début as a baritone in 1909 at Strasbourg. After further study in Milan and Dresden, he returned in 1911 as a tenor, singing first at Nuremberg and then at Wiesbaden (1913–17), where he concentrated on the Wagnerian repertory. His career was then divided largely between Hamburg and Vienna. He sang in the première of E. W. Korngold's Die tote Stadt (1920, Hamburg), and was also closely associated with Richard Strauss in early performances of Ariadne auf Naxos, Die Frau ohne Schatten and Die ägyptische Helena. Abroad he sang in Paris, Buenos Aires and Chicago. He had a wide repertory of lyric and dramatic roles in Italian and French opera, including Rodolfo, Faust, Radames and Otello. His last appearance in Vienna was as Eisenstein in Die Fledermaus in 1937, after which he sang and directed the opera at Osnabrück and then retired to teach. His recordings show a vividly expressive and unusually lyrical style in the Wagnerian repertory; in association with his attractive stage presence these qualities gave him a leading position among the German tenors of his time.

From The Grove Book of Opera Singers in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Opera.


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