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scientific management


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One of the classic approaches to management theory, which emphasizes the rationality of organizational systems and holds that operational efficiency can be optimized by applying the appropriate scientific management principles. Developed by Frederick Taylor in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the theory forms the basis for the techniques now known as work study. The key principles were: Managers should take full responsibility for the planning of work and should use scientific methods to specify precisely how the job should be done to achieve the maximum efficiency. Managers should select the most appropriate person for the job, train them to do the job efficiently, and monitor their performance to ensure conformity to the specification.Scientific management is credited with increasing productivity enormously, but only at the cost of deskilling many areas of work. The boring, repetitive, and alienating nature of the jobs created using scientific management methods causes demotivation in staff and can lead to an extreme emphasis on pay rates as the primary form of motivation.

Managers should take full responsibility for the planning of work and should use scientific methods to specify precisely how the job should be done to achieve the maximum efficiency.

Managers should select the most appropriate person for the job, train them to do the job efficiently, and monitor their performance to ensure conformity to the specification.

Subjects: Business and Management.


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