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1.n. (in surgery) the act of cutting (the cut or division made is also called a section). For example, an abdominal section is performed for surgical exploration of the abdomen (see laparotomy). A transverse section is a cut made at right angles to a structure’s long axis. See also Caesarean section. 2.n. (in imaging) a three-dimensional reconstruction of body scans obtained by computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. These are reconstituted as transverse and sagittal plane sections, less commonly as coronal plane sections. 3.n. (in microscopy) a thin slice of the specimen to be examined under a microscope. 4.vb. (in psychiatry) to issue an order for the compulsory admission of a patient to a psychiatric hospital for assessment and/or treatment under the appropriate provision or section of the Mental Health Act 1983 as amended by the Mental Health Act 2007. There are formal procedures, such as review and right to appeal, to ensure this legislation is not abused. A patient who otherwise has capacity may still consent to or refuse treatment for conditions unrelated to the mental disorder for which he or she is detained.

1.n. (in surgery) the act of cutting (the cut or division made is also called a section). For example, an abdominal section is performed for surgical exploration of the abdomen (see laparotomy). A transverse section is a cut made at right angles to a structure’s long axis. See also Caesarean section. 2.n. (in imaging) a three-dimensional reconstruction of body scans obtained by computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. These are reconstituted as transverse and sagittal plane sections, less commonly as coronal plane sections. 3.n. (in microscopy) a thin slice of the specimen to be examined under a microscope. 4.vb. (in psychiatry) to issue an order for the compulsory admission of a patient to a psychiatric hospital for assessment and/or treatment under the appropriate provision or section of the Mental Health Act 1983 as amended by the Mental Health Act 2007. There are formal procedures, such as review and right to appeal, to ensure this legislation is not abused. A patient who otherwise has capacity may still consent to or refuse treatment for conditions unrelated to the mental disorder for which he or she is detained.

Subjects: Medicine and Health.


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